The Allied Health capability framework provided by health.vic is to understand the capabilities of allied health to support the needs of those with disability.

The domain of Individual support and its capabilities are as follows:

1. Understands disability and complex support needs

2. Promotes independence and informed choice

3. Works in partnership with the person to set and achieve goals

4. Thinks flexibly and tailors interventions to the person

5. Communicates effectively

6. Works collaboratively with the person’s supports

Interprofessional practice:  

7. Operates within the scope of practice

8. Collaborates with interprofessional

Systems: 

9. Navigates the National Disability Insurance Scheme

10. Collaborates across service systems

Quality, Safety and Ethics: 

11. Acts ethically and resolves conflicts

12. Promotes safety, quality and inclusion

Allied health workforce

Our Therapies | Connect2Care

Dyslexia is a very common learning disability in Australia, with an estimated 20% of children suffering from mild to severe dyslexia. By working with a speech pathologist for speech therapy for dyslexia, individuals gain several benefits.

What is dyslexia?

Dyslexia, primarily known as a language-based disorder, significantly impacts an individual’s ability to read. For individuals with dyslexia, honing reading strategies and skills becomes a vital part of their journey.

The role of speech therapy in managing dyslexia

Speech pathologists help with the assessment and treatment of dyslexia. They are trained to access overall language skills, including those critical to reading, such a phonological awareness and subsequent targeting intervention to help individuals with dyslexia learn to read.

Phonological awareness is essential for reading, writing, rhyming, and manipulating syllables, such as blending and segmenting. These skills allow us to understand what sounds make up a particular word and manipulate sounds to form words. Programs that target phonological awareness and literacy skills are available, such as ‘The Gillon Phonological Awareness Training Programme.’

Benefits of speech therapy for dyslexia

  1. Building Phonological Skills: A key focus in dyslexia therapy is enhancing phonological awareness. This makes the process of reading and writing more approachable and less daunting.
  2. Reading with Ease and Understanding: Through speech therapy sessions, individuals with dyslexia can improve their reading skills. This leads to better understanding and enjoyment of reading, turning a challenging task into a delightful experience.
  3. Growing Confidence: As reading becomes less challenging, there is often a wonderful growth in self-esteem. This newfound confidence can positively influence all areas of life, including school and social situations.

Speech pathologists at Connect2Care

Connect2Care’s experienced Speech Pathologists are ready to provide expert, caring assistance to unlock the full potential of every individual. Contact us today to learn more about our dyslexia therapy services and how we can support your journey towards success and confidence.

 

NDIS Speech Pathology | Speech Therapy | Connect2Care

References:

1. The Gillon Phonological Awareness Training Programme booklet: Microsoft Word – programme booklet 2008.doc (canterbury.ac.nz)

2. Reading Rockets | Launching Young Readers  this website provides general information about reading and some research-based reading strategies/intervention; it is also a good source for finding the appropriate books based on age, genre, and reading level.

“Not only does language development support the child’s ability to communicate, but also their ability to express their feelings, problem-solving skills and developing and maintaining relationships.” 
Jenny Ngo – Speech Pathologist at Connect2Care

Repeat, Sit Down & Read 

Help stimulate and develop your child’s language.

Language is vital to a child’s development. It complements a range of other developments, such as cognitive, social, and literacy.

For instance, children with language delays benefit from repeating words they hear multiple times daily in different situations. An example is using the term “up” when picking up your child while in their cot and when going upstairs. 

Give your child more opportunities to learn that word. Sit down and share a book with your child as it is proven to help increase a child’s language and reading development. Studies have shown that having books in the home and reading regular bedtime stories can improve a child’s vocabulary and help increase comprehension.

NDIS Early Support Services & Pediatric Therapy | Connect2Care

Dickinson, D., Griffith, J., Golinkoff, R., & Hirsh-Pasek, K. (2012). How Reading Books Fosters Language Development around the World. Child Development Research, 2012, 1-15.DOI: 10.1155/2012/602807 Hagen, A. (2017). Improving the Odds: Identifying Language Activities that Support the Language Development of Preschoolers with Poorer Vocabulary Skills. Scandinavian Journal Of Educational Research, 62(5),649-663. DOI: 10.1080/00313831.2016.1258727

The Wonders of Shared Book Reading Research has indicated that interactive shared book reading can support a wide range of early language skills and that children who read regularly in the early years learn language faster, enter school with a larger vocabulary and become more successful readers.

Speech Pathologist Hannah’s Top Tip 

To enhance shared book reading, the ‘4 comments, 1 question’ strategy can be implemented. When reading with the child, make 4 comments on each page. For instance: ‘The bird is flying’ or ‘The bear is brown’. Follow this with 1 question. For instance: ‘What colour is the bear?’. This strategy exposes children to a greater amount of vocabulary and further develops comprehension abilities.

 

 

NDIS Speech Pathology & Speech Therapy | Connect2Care

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